PRESENTS
Social media integration
CampusWell program includes:
Online magazine
Faculty and staff blog
Monthly promotional tools
Mobile app
Client Portal
Your media platform starts with a beautifully designed online magazine; a year-long resource for students with topics that impact their lives and academic success.
Your wellness magazine is full of research-based information that offers clear learning objectives, but is also compelling and engaging to students.
Online magazine
10 monthly issues (September to June) plus one bonus orientation issue New content released every week Features include: original articles, videos, images, quizzes, student generated content, and interactive infographics Actionable content that is presented with a strong student voice and a “teach don’t preach” tone
Get students involved
You have the option to make students part of your wellness promotion program—not just part of the audience. Students can create videos, write personal essays, become Campus Correspondents, post announcements, author articles, and help promote the program throughout campus.
We’ve designed a mobile app so students can access your CampusWell on their mobile devices or tablets.
Mobile application
Our in-house social media team can create and manage social media pages to support your CampusWell program.
The Student Advocate blog is designed for administrators, faculty, and staff so they can stay informed about the latest developments in student wellness. Administrators, faculty, and staff can receive their own subscription to both the blog and student magazine.
Community involvement
Keep wellness at the forefront of students’ minds with our professionally designed promotional tools. Print and digital displays serve to heighten the awareness of topics featured in your CampusWell publication.
Table tents for the cafeteria
Promotional tools
Slideshows for your digital screens
Posters for the halls and bathroom stalls
To order your school-wide wellness program now, or to talk to a sales specialist, click here.
Next steps...
Based in behavior change theory and peer education
Research-based
Highly specialized and actionable
Delivered with a friendly, relatable tone
Tailored to students’ needs
Includes harm reduction strategies
CampusWell as a content provider
Custom resources
Your program will be customized to include your logo and school resources. Students are directed to local campus resources based on the topic.
Choose between Student Health 101 or CampusWell branding.
Or choose Private Label to customize your site with your own brand.
Logo customization
wellness noun | well-ness | \ˈwelnəs\ 
A lifelong process of becoming aware of and making choices towards a healthy and fulfilling life
—World Health Organization
Student affairs professionals know that the link between
STUDENT WELLNESS
LEARNING
is STRONG.
and
Wellness is not accomplished as a stand-alone process. It needs to be integrated into the culture of the campus.
The solution: CampusWell is a versatile platform that helps make a multi-departmental wellness initiative simple, effective, and sustainable.
The challenge: The idea of launching and maintaining a sustained division-wide (multi-department) student wellness program is daunting. Student services departments are often constrained by their own department initiatives and can find it difficult to coordinate with other departments.
Each participating department becomes a source of authoritative, relevant knowledge for students, presented in the context of a unified vision of well-being.
3
CampusWell is based on three foundational concepts:
1
2
8 Dimensions of Wellness
Economic well-being
Economic
Office of Sustainability
Counseling Services
Academic Support Services Academic Advising Tutoring Services
Meditation Programs Campus Chapels Interfaith Programs Faith-based and Religious Services
Spiritual
Emotional
Environmental well-being
First, student affairs departments are already inextricably aligned with wellness.
Emotional well-being
Occupational
Intellectual well-being
Spiritual well-being
Social
Career Services
Residential Life Student Activities Student Government Greek Affairs Community Service Student Union Multicultural Services Disability Services
Intellectual
Recreation and Fitness Dining Services Campus Safety Health Services
Financial Aid
Environmental
Occupational well-being
Social well-being
Physical
Physical  well-being
Active and passive acquisition of health-related information on the Web by college students Josipa Basic and Sanda Erdelez University of Missouri,  111 London Hall jbyv7@mail.missouri.edu, ErdelezS@missouri.edu
Second, maintaining a comprehensive, effective, and sustainable outreach program will encourage students to utilize campus services available to them.
74%
Students are both active and passive seekers of health and wellness information:
64%
of college students actively seek wellness related information on the web more than once per month
of college students passively acquire wellness related information on the web more than once per month
Third, an interdepartmental wellness initiative should seek to leverage its existing student services in the context of a holistic wellness environment.
Students receive weekly announcements about new wellness topics from CampusWell
Departments receive in-depth reporting on student engagement
Sponsoring departments promote their own announcements, events, and content on platform
Two or more student affairs departments each sponsor one or more wellness dimensions
Sponsoring departments select feature topics that support their respective wellness dimension
CampusWell is a content platform designed to encourage students to engage campus resources.
Students are referred to appropriate campus services/departments as they engage
Here’s how it works:
…and more, to their own page on the platform
videos
schedules
announcements
Each participating department can post... 
articles
activities
Manage it all from one simple interface
Receive a real time analysis of your student engagement
Best of all, each department can maintain control of its own messaging and programming, a common challenge with interdepartmental coordination
Multi-department service
Single department service
One campus home page
Each department has its own home page and editorial calendar
One department deployment with unlimited number of users
Two Service Levels
Multi-department deployment with unlimited number of users and departments
Standard Content is written for students ages 18-24 at a 4-year U.S. institution
Canadian Content is written for students ages 18-24 at a 2- or 4-year Canadian institution (similar to Standard)
2
Non-traditional Content is written for students ages 18-40+ at a 2- or 4-year U.S. institution
Four Editions
3
4
1
Conservative Content is written for students ages 18-24 at a 4-year U.S. institution but some or all sexual health content is removed
The versatile platform that makes a multi-departmental wellness initiative simple, effective, and sustainable.
Appendix
Between 66.1 and 84.8% of college students use the Internet to acquire health-related information on a regular basis Students often look for information related to the following topics: sexual health, diet, nutrition and vitamins, exercise and fitness, and mental health (Escoffery et al, 2005; Buhi et al., 2009; Zuckerman, 2009; Percheski & Hargaittai, 2011; Hogan & Sweeney, 2012)
Students using internet to acquire health related information
Health and wellness ranks high on students everyday life information needs
This figure shows information needs arising for respondents within the previous six months. Respondents were asked to “click all that apply.” (How College Students Use the Web to Conduct Everyday Research by Alison J. Head and Michael B. Eisenberg
80% of the students start their search about health and wellness topics from a website created by the University, non-profit organization, or government.
Active and passive acquisition of health-related information on the Web by college students Josipa Basic and Sanda Erdelez University of Missouri,  111 London Hall jbyv7@mail.missouri.edu, ErdelezS@missouri.edu
Students often go to their college first for information
https://tinyurl.com/y9rb9udx
How College Students Use the Web to Conduct Everyday Research” by Alison J. Head and Michael B. Eisenberg
How students evaluate everyday life research
More than any other criteria, the site’s design received the most scrutiny (56%) “When I’m searching the Web, one of the biggest things that I’m going to look at is the ease of use and if there is a bunch of broken links or ads for weird products then it’s a site I generally won’t trust.” More than half the student respondents reported (54%) that whether they used the site before was a frequent criteria used for assessing the quality of web content. More than half of the respondents (54 percent) considered the currency of Web content (e.g., checking the data in footer details). They also relied on the authority of posted content, too, by judging the origin of a site’s URL (49 percent) and/or an author’s credentials (49 percent).
Active and passive acquisition of wellness related topics
Active and passive acquisition of health-related information on the Web by college students Josipa Basic and Sanda Erdelez University of Missouri,  111 London Hall jbyv7@mail.missouri.edu, ErdelezS@missouri.edu
n=2193   74% of college students actively seek wellness related information on the web more than once per month 64% of college students passively acquire wellness information on the web more than once per month
Approximately half of college students who completed the National College Health Assessment 2013 indicated a greater need for health-related information from their college.